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NIH

Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

$46M in BRAIN Initiative grants include device awards

The earliest awards from the U.S. National Institutes of Health in support of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, totaling $46 million in fiscal 2014, have been disclosed. The funding goes to more than 100 investigators in 15 locations in the U.S. and three nations.

NIH backs database-driven approach to neuromuscular research

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a clutch of big-name academic centers funding to create a database for studying motor neuron disorders. By embarking on a large-scale data generation drive and analyzing the resulting information, the collaborators hope to build profiles for Lou Gehrig's disease and other neuromuscular conditions.

NIH launches study of 'exceptional responders' to cancer therapies

The National Cancer Institute has launched a three to four year broad-based study of exceptional responders--patients who have had particularly good outcomes on cancer therapies as compared to their peers. The initiative was first considered a few years ago when it started to become easier to determine the molecular basis of why a particular patient's cancer responds to a molecularly targeted drug, but it is only being undertaken now.

10 volunteers receive Glaxo Ebola vaccine with no adverse effects yet

As the death toll of West Africa's Ebola outbreak reaches 2,500, GlaxoSmithKline's experimental Ebola vaccine is being tested at the U.S. National Institutes of Health with no apparent ill effects so far, health officials report.

Notable academic-pharma alliances of 2014

Pharma companies are increasingly relying on academic and nonprofit collaborations for basic science and drug discovery research, and some big players have formed some notable unions in 2014.

Novel epitope for binding of HIV antibodies has major drug delivery implications

The discovery of a new HIV antibody highlights the need to create vaccines with trimeric delivery systems that resemble those found naturally, said Mark Connors, the research team's principal investigator and chief of the HIV-Specific Immunity Section.

More improperly stored pathogens found in government labs

The U.S. government hasn't seen the last of its laboratory safety woes. Following a handful of accidents involving the mismanagement of highly infectious pathogens at federal facilities in recent months, the National Institutes of Health revealed on Sept. 5 that it uncovered small amounts of other improperly stored pathogens--including the toxin ricin and plague-causing bacteria.

Oraya receives NIH grant to study use of its novel eye radiation tech against cancer

Ophthalmology company Oraya Therapeutics will collaborate with researchers from Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute to study applications of its novel radiation therapy against cancer when used in conjunction with gold nanoparticles.

Device to combat wet AMD spreads in Europe, spurs NIH interest

Wet age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The standard of care calls for about 8 costly injections into the eye of medication containing anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) per year. "In the real world having patients maintain that level of monitoring and therapy just does not happen," Jim Taylor, who has struggled to convince his aging mother to receive the therapy, told  FierceMedicalDevices  in an interview.

Nanopores, microfluidics get $14.5M from NIH for new DNA sequencing tech

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $14.5 million in eight grants to researchers working to develop high quality and low cost DNA sequencing. The grants are each for two to four years and are awarded through the Advanced DNA Sequencing Technology program of the National Human Genome Research Institute, a part of NIH.